Amazon’s Kindle book reader product for Amazon. Considering that Amazon has, in the perception of the buying public, a very strong link with both books and electronics the Kindle fits in really well with the Amazon business model.

Over the course of 2009, e-book readers in general, and the Kindle in particular, were the cool “must have” personal electronics devices of the year. All the signs are that sales will keep growing at an almost exponential rate throughout 2010. The market is still very new and is developing and changing at lightning speed.

Right now, the Kindle is the market leader by a long way. It currently has a 60% share of the U.S. e-book reader market. Sony is in second place with a smaller but nonetheless creditable 35% market share. There are a whole host of competitors who have now developed e-book readers of their own in an attempt to get a piece of the action in what is forecast to become a large and profitable market.

It’s a compliment to Amazon, albeit a slightly back-handed one, that practically every new e-book reader that displays and potential is immediately dubbed the “Kindle Killer”. However, bearing in mind that the Kindle is now Amazon’s number one selling item, you can be certain that Amazon will be fighting tooth and nail to hang on to the lead position.
Amazon has responded to growing competition by lowering the ticket price of the Kindle 2.0 from its $ 359 launch level to $ 259. The price of the Kindle DX, which probably has a little less competition just at the moment, remains unchanged. There have also been firmware updates, including the addition of pdf support and extended battery life, among others.

Amazon has also now released both the Kindle 2.0 and the DX in more than 100 countries globally. In truth, Amazon could probably sell Kindles in the States as fast as it could manufacture them – but establishing a global Kindle presence is a wise long term strategy for Amazon.

Over and above developing the Kindle reader itself and entering new markets, Amazon continues to expand the choice of Kindle books available on its Kindle store. There are currently over 400,000 titles available – and this number is being added to at an average rate of 500 each and every day.

So, although there are a huge number of manufacturers scrambling to develop e-book readers in order to break into the market, Amazon is probably quietly confident. Rather than simply focusing on hardware development, Amazon is making improvements in a number of different areas. They are developing the existing Kindle, tweaking prices, expanding their market, expanding the selection of available books and generally capitalising on their market leadership position. When they decide to launch the Kindle 4 – sometime this year in all probability – they are going to consolidate their leadership position even more.

has proven itself to be the perfect product for Amazon. Bearing in mind that Amazon has, in the perception of the buying public, a very strong link with both books and electronics the Kindle fits in really well with Amazon’s business model.

During the course of 2009, e-book readers in general, and the Kindle in particular, became the trendy “must have” gadgets of the year. It looks like sales will keep growing very rapidly throughout 2010. The market is still in its infancy and is changing and developing rapidly.

Currently, the Kindle is the market leader by a long way. It currently has a 60% share of the U.S. e-book reader market. Sony is in second place with a smaller but nonetheless creditable 35% market share. There is a long list of competitors who have now developed e-book readers of their own in an attempt to get a piece of the action in what is forecast to become a large and profitable market.

In a way, it’s a back-handed compliment to Amazon that practically every new e-book reader that displays and potential is instantly hailed as the “Kindle Killer”. However, considering the fact that the Kindle is now Amazon’s top selling product, you can be certain that Amazon will be fighting tooth and nail to see off challengers for the top slot.
Amazon has responded to growing competition by lowering the price of the Kindle 2.0 by $ 100 from its February launch price to $ 259. The price of the Kindle DX, which probably has a little less competition just at the moment, remains unchanged. There have also been firmware updates, including prolonged battery life and the addition of pdf support for the Kindle 2.0, among others.

Amazon has also now released both the Kindle 2.0 and the DX in more than 100 countries around the world. In fact, Amazon could probably sell Kindles as fast as they can make them just in the USA – but developing an international Kindle presence is probably a very smart move in the long term.

Over and above tweaking the Kindle reader itself and expanding into new markets, Amazon continues to expand the choice of Kindle books available on its website. There are currently more than 400,000 titles available – and this number is being added to at an average rate of over 500 a day.

So, although there are a lot of manufacturers frantically developing e-book readers in order to break into the market, Amazon is probably quietly confident. Rather than simply focusing on hardware development, Amazon is making improvements in a number of different areas. They are improving the existing Kindle, adjusting prices, growing their market, increasing the choice of books on offer and generally capitalising on their dominant market position. Whenever they decide to release the Kindle 4 – sometime this year in all probability – they will simply consolidate their leadership position even further.

Amazon Capitalise On The Kindle Reader’s Leading Position

Posted by admin on February 11th, 2010

The Amazon Kindle e-book readerhas clearly shown that it is the ideal product for Amazon. Bearing in mind that Amazon has, in the perception of the buying public, a very strong link with both electronics and books the Kindle fits in really well with During the course of 2009, e-book readers as a whole, and especially the Kindle, became the cool “must have” gadgets of the year. It’s predicted that sales will keep growing very rapidly throughout 2010. The market is still young and is developing and changing rapidly.

Right now, the Kindle is the market leader by a long way. It currently has a 60% share of the U.S. e-book reader market. Sony is in second place with a creditable 35% market share. There are a whole host of competing manufacturers who have now developed their own e-book readers in order to get a piece of the action in what is forecast to become a large and profitable market.

In a way, it’s a back-handed compliment to Amazon that virtually every new e-book reader that displays and potential is instantly hailed as the “Kindle Killer”. However, bearing in mind that the Kindle is now Amazon’s best selling item, you can be certain that Amazon will fight hard to hang on to the lead position.
Amazon has responded to growing competition by cutting the price of the Kindle 2.0 from its $ 359 launch level to $ 259. The price of the Kindle DX remains, for the moment at least, unchanged. There have also been firmware updates, including the addition of pdf support and extended battery life, among others.

Both the Kindle 2.0 and the DX are now on sale in more than 100 countries worldwide. In truth, Amazon could probably sell Kindles in the States as fast as it could manufacture them – but establishing a global Kindle presence is probably a very smart move in the long term.

Over and above enhancing the Kindle reader itself and entering new markets, Amazon continues to add to the selection of Kindle books available on its Kindle store. Right now there are in excess of 400,000 titles available – and this number is being added to at an average rate of 500 each and every day.

So, even although there are a lot of manufacturers scrambling to develop e-book readers in order to grab a share of the market, Amazon probably has good reason to feel quietly confident. Rather than simply focusing on the development of the hardware itself, Amazon is advancing on a broad front. They are updating the existing Kindle, adjusting prices, expanding their market, expanding the choice of books on offer and generally capitalising on their dominant market position. When they decide to release the Kindle 4 – expect to see it sometime in 2010 – they are going to consolidate their leadership position even further.

Amazon’s Kindle book reader product for Amazon. Considering that Amazon has, in the perception of the buying public, a very strong link with both books and electronics the Kindle is a great fit for the Amazon business model.

During the course of 2009, e-book readers as a whole, and the Kindle in particular, were the hot “must have” personal electronics devices of the year. It’s predicted that sales will continue to grow very rapidly throughout 2010. The market is still very new and is developing and changing at lightning speed.

Right now, the Kindle is the leader of the pack. It currently has a 60% share of the U.S. e-book reader market. Sony takes the second place position with a creditable 35% market share. There is a long list of competing manufacturers who have now developed e-book readers of their own in order to get a slice of the pie in what is anticipated to be a large and lucrative market.

In a way, it’s a back-handed compliment to Amazon that practically every new e-book reader that displays and potential is instantly given the title of the “Kindle Killer”. However, bearing in mind that the Kindle is now Amazon’s top selling product, you can be sure that Amazon will fight hard to hang on to the lead position.
Amazon has responded to growing competition by lowering the ticket price of the Kindle 2.0 by $ 100 from its February launch price to $ 259. The price of the Kindle DX remains, for the moment at least, unchanged. There have also been firmware updates, including prolonged battery life and the addition of pdf support for the Kindle 2.0, among others.

Amazon has also now released both the Kindle 2.0 and the DX in over 100 countries around the world. In reality, Amazon could probably sell Kindles as fast as they can make them just in the USA – but developing a global Kindle presence is a wise long term strategy for Amazon.

In addition to tweaking the Kindle reader itself and entering new markets, Amazon continues to increase the choice of Kindle books available on its website. There are currently over 400,000 titles available – and this number is increasing at an average rate of 500 each and every day.

So, although there are a lot of manufacturers frantically developing e-book readers in order to break into the market, Amazon probably has good reason to feel quietly confident. Rather than just concentrating on hardware development, Amazon is advancing on a broad front. They are updating the existing Kindle, adjusting prices, expanding their market, expanding the selection of books on offer and generally capitalising on their market leadership position. When they decide to launch the Kindle 4 – sometime this year in all probability – they will simply consolidate their leadership position even further.

has proven itself to be the perfect product for Amazon. Bearing in mind that Amazon has such a strong association with both books and electronics the Kindle is a great fit for the Amazon business model.

During the course of 2009, e-book readers as a whole, and especially the Kindle, were the cool “must have” gadgets of the year. All the signs are that sales will keep growing at a very rapid rate throughout 2010. The market is still in its infancy and is developing and changing rapidly.

At the moment, the Kindle is way ahead of the chasing pack. It currently enjoys an impressive 60% share of the U.S. e-book reader market. Sony takes the second place position with a creditable 35% market share. There is a long list of competing manufacturers who have now developed e-book readers of their own in order to get a piece of the action in what looks like being a large and profitable market.

It’s a compliment to Amazon, albeit a slightly back-handed one, that almost every new e-book reader that shows any promise is immediately dubbed the “Kindle Killer”. However, bearing in mind that the Kindle is now Amazon’s best selling product, you can be certain that Amazon will fight hard to see off challengers for the top slot.
Amazon has responded to growing competition by cutting the ticket price of the Kindle 2.0 from its $ 359 launch level to $ 259. The price of the Kindle DX remains, for the moment at least, unchanged. There have also been firmware updates, including prolonged battery life and the addition of pdf support for the Kindle 2.0, among others.

Amazon has also now released both the Kindle 2.0 and the DX in more than 100 countries around the world. In truth, Amazon could probably sell Kindles in the States as fast as it could manufacture them – but establishing a global Kindle presence is probably a very smart move in the long term.

Over and above developing the Kindle reader itself and entering new markets, Amazon continues to expand the library of Kindle books available on its Kindle store. Right now there are over 400,000 titles available – and this number is growing at an average rate of over 500 a day.

So, even although there are a huge number of manufacturers scrambling to develop e-book readers in order to break into the market, Amazon probably has good reason to feel quietly confident. Rather than simply focusing on the development of the hardware itself, Amazon is making improvements in a number of different areas. They are improving the existing Kindle, adjusting prices, expanding their market, increasing the choice of books on offer and generally capitalising on their market leadership position. When they decide to launch the Kindle 4 – expect to see it sometime in 2010 – they are going to consolidate their leadership position even further.

The Amazon Kindle e-book readerConsidering that Amazon has, in the perception of the buying public, a very strong link with both electronics and books the Kindle fits in really well with Amazon’s business model.

During the course of 2009, e-book readers as a whole, and the Kindle in particular, were the hot “must have” gadgets of the year. It’s predicted that sales will continue to grow very rapidly throughout 2010. The market is still in its infancy and is changing and developing rapidly.

Right now, the Kindle is way out in front. It currently has a 60% share of the U.S. e-book reader market. Sony takes the second place position with a creditable 35% market share. There is a long list of competing manufacturers who have now developed e-book readers of their own in order to get a slice of the pie in what is forecast to become a large and lucrative market.

It’s a compliment to Amazon, albeit a slightly back-handed one, that virtually every new e-book reader that shows any promise is instantly hailed as the “Kindle Killer”. However, considering the fact that the Kindle is now Amazon’s best selling product, you can be sure that Amazon will fight hard to hang on to the lead position.
Amazon has responded to growing competition by cutting the price of the Kindle 2.0 by $ 100 from its February launch price to $ 259. The price of the Kindle DX, which probably has a little less competition just at the moment, remains unchanged. There have also been firmware updates, including prolonged battery life and the addition of pdf support for the Kindle 2.0, among others.

Both the Kindle 2.0 and the DX are now on sale in more than 100 countries worldwide. In fact, Amazon could probably sell Kindles as fast as they can make them just in the USA – but developing a global Kindle presence is a wise long term strategy for Amazon.

In addition to tweaking the Kindle reader itself and expanding into new markets, Amazon continues to increase the choice of Kindle books available on its website. Right now there are in excess of 400,000 titles available – and this number is growing at an average rate of 500 each and every day.

So, even although there are a huge number of manufacturers frantically developing e-book readers in order to break into the market, Amazon probably has good reason to feel quietly confident. Rather than simply focusing on the development of the hardware itself, Amazon is advancing on a broad front. They are improving the existing Kindle, tweaking prices, expanding their market, increasing the choice of books on offer and generally capitalising on their dominant market position. Whenever they decide to launch the Kindle 4 – during the course of 2010 most likely – they are going to consolidate their leadership position even further.